Our Top Priority: Racial Equity

THE SITUATION

Racial equity remains our highest priority. Young people of color make up half of all youth in Multnomah County, but their outcomes consistently lag behind their white counterparts.

If we continue to fail kids of color, the social and economic consequences for our community are dire. We must continue to combine the efforts of organizations and individuals who
work tirelessly but too often have worked alone.

 

THE WORK SO FAR

We focus our work on schools and neighborhoods that have large populations of both students of color and students living in poverty. Culturally-specific organizations are on-site delivering critical services in many of these schools. We bring them together with teachers and administrators as equal partners to create a shared sense of ownership. Experience shows that this paradigm shift is essential and powerful.

 

SIGNS OF PROGRESS

Countywide graduation rates have climbed 20 percentage points since 2009. Latino students have seen a 31-point increase, and African American students have gained 22 points. Nineteen percent
fewer students of color were suspended or expelled in 2017–18 than six years earlier. While we celebrate these gains, we must focus on areas where we see less progress, or where recent gains could slip backward without persistent effort.

 

THE WORK YET TO BE DONE

It is as simple as it is critical. As we continue seeing improvement countywide, outcomes for our young people of color must accelerate at a faster rate.

 


“Racial equity would not be as fully integrated across our community without this Partnership. All Hands Raised has helped create the trust to have the difficult conversations needed
to ensure success for our black and brown children.”

– Karis Stoudamire-Phillips, Corporate Social Responsibility Director, Moda Health